A project manager is a specialist advisor that represents the client and is responsible for the day-to-day management of a project. They rarely participate directly in activities, but instead help to maintain the progress and interaction between the team to help reduce risk of failure, maximise benefits and control costs.

Preparation process

Before a project can take place, the initial preparation tasks must be completed, which includes carrying out a topographic survey of the site.

Surveys determine where existing facilities are, such as drainage, power supply and cabling, along with establishing the best area to install a new infrastructure. These surveys are conducted in rural landscapes, urban areas and brownfield sites, producing accurate and detailed surveys from any natural or artificial area.

Planning the project

Once the initial preparation has taken place, it’s time for the project team to produce a plan for everyone to follow. During this phase, the project manager creates a project management plan – a formal, approved document to guide and advise.

The plan outlines the scope, cost, schedule baselines, communication rules and goals and objectives. Other documents included in the planning phase include scope statement, work breakdown, communication plan and risk management plan.

Carrying out the works

Once the planning stages have begun – it’s time for the work to begin! After a team with all of the consultants and contractors, the project team begins to assign resources, execute project management plans, update the schedule and modify the project plan.

End of the major building development

The last phase is project completion; some project managers will hold a meeting to evaluate the success and failure in the project. A list will be drawn up by the team on any tasks that weren’t accomplished, so they put together a final budget and create a project report.